Controlling Asset Precompilation in Rails

I’ve run into issues recently with precompilation after introducing new gems containing partial SASS files (Bootstrap and Font Awesome).

Rails allows you to specify patterns or Procs to determine which files should – or in our case should not – be precompiled, like this:

Rails.application.config.assets.precompile = [Proc.new {|e| !(e =~ /(font-awesome|bootstrap)\/_/) } ]

Upgrading to RSpec 3

I recently upgraded our Rails application to use RSpec 3, which is currently in its second beta, from 2.99. I was expecting it to be nice and straightforward, but sadly it was not! This was partly because we have been using RR for mocking and stubbing, and the syntax was not compatible with RSpec 3.

In the process of upgrading I learned a bunch about the new RSpec “allow” syntax, which in my opinion is far nicer than the RR one we were using.

Here’s how to stub:

allow(thing).to receive(:method).with(args).and_return(other_thing)

Mocking can be done in the same way by substituting “allow” for “expect” – although in most cases the tests read better if you test that the stub received the method using the following matcher:

expect(thing).to have_received(:method).with(args)

That this is different to the previous RR syntax, which was expect(thing).to have_received.method(args)
You can also use argument matchers, for example:

expect(thing).to have_received(:method).with(a_kind_of(Class))

And you can verify how many times a method was called:

expect(object).to have_received(method).at_least(:once)
expect(object).to have_received(method).exactly(3).times

The .with(args) and .and_return(other_thing) methods are optional. You can also invoke a different function:

allow(thing).to receive(:method) { |args| block }

Or call the original function:

allow(thing).to receive(:method).and_call_original

Another thing we used fairly often was any_instance_of. This is now cleaner (RR used to take a block):

allow_any_instance_of(Class).to receive(:method).and_return
allow_any_instance_of(Class).to receive(:method) { |instance, args| block}

If you pass a block, the first argument when it gets called is the instance it is called on.
In RSpec 3, be_false and be_true are deprecated. Instead, use eq false or eq true. You can use be in place of eq, but when the test fails you get a longer error message, pointing out that the error may be due to incorrect object reference, which is irrelevant and kind of annoying.

Using RSpec mocks means that we can create new mock or stub objects using double(Class_or_name) rather than Object.new, which results in tidier error messages and clearer test code.

Stubbing a chain of methods may also be a handy tool – I only found one place where we used it, but it is useful if we’re chaining together methods to search models.

allow(object).to receive_message_chain(:method1, :method2)

More info:

  1. https://relishapp.com/rspec/rspec-mocks/docs
  2. https://github.com/rspec/rspec-mocks

Update: it turns out I was missing a configuration option in RSpec. It should have worked with RR by doing this:

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
  rspec.mock_with :rr
end

Thanks Myron for clearing this up :)